Thursday, August 21, 2014

To Achieve Diversity In Publishing, A Difficult Dialogue Beats Silence : Code Switch : NPR

To Achieve Diversity In Publishing, A Difficult Dialogue Beats Silence : Code Switch : NPR: Last spring, a group calling itself We Need Diverse Books launched a Twitter campaign to press for greater diversity in children's books. Writer Daniel José Older supports the campaign, but he doesn't think it goes far enough.

"We need diverse agents, we need editors, we need diverse book buyers, we need diverse illustrators, and we need diverse executives and CEOs at the top, too." 

Older says the industry needs to take an honest look at who holds the power over who gets published. Because as things stand now, Older argues, writers of color often find themselves navigating a world that makes them feel unwelcome.

"Well, let's start out with what we know, which is that publishing is overwhelmingly white," he says. "Now, that's not a controversial fact, but sometimes to point it out becomes a controversial thing — to speak that truth."

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Here's What Happens to Police Officers Who Shoot Unarmed Black Men | Mother Jones

Here's What Happens to Police Officers Who Shoot Unarmed Black Men | Mother Jones: In the week since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, initial autopsy findings, police reports, and eyewitness accounts have begun to provide some insights into the circumstances of his death. But plenty of questions remain unanswered, not the least of them: Where is Officer Darren Wilson, and what's likely to happen to him?

Wilson, who was put on administrative leave after killing Brown, reportedly left home with his family a few days before his name was made public. A fundraising campaign launched on August 17 has already raised more than $10,000 to cover the financial needs of Wilson's family, "including legal fees." (The campaign has since increased its goal to $100,000.)

It remains to be seen whether Wilson will face criminal charges, but a limited review of similar killings by police suggests that the officers more often than not walk away without an indictment, and are very rarely convicted. Delores Jones-Brown, a law professor and director of the Center on Race, Crime, and Justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, looked at 21 publicized cases from 1994 through 2009 in which a police officer killed an unarmed black person.

Public opinions on Brown killing show division by race

Public opinions on Brown killing show division by race: JUDY WOODRUFF: It turns out that there is a sharp racial divide in the United States when it comes to reactions to the shooting of Michael Brown and the ongoing protests in Ferguson.

[nh_link align="right"]That’s one of the findings revealed in a new survey by the Pew Research Center.

Here to explain is Carroll Doherty. He’s the director of political research there. And he joins us.

We thank you for being here today.

CARROLL DOHERTY, Pew Research Center: Thanks for inviting me.

JUDY WOODRUFF: So, your poll done nationally. It was August 14 through 17, so done last Thursday through Sunday, you were just telling me. And it shows a really — some stark findings about how whites and blacks view the question of whether race is an issue here.

CARROLL DOHERTY: That’s the first question, whether race is an issue or whether it’s getting too much attention.

BBC News - Macy's settles racial profiling allegations from shoppers

BBC News - Macy's settles racial profiling allegations from shoppers: Under a deal with New York's attorney-general Macy's agreed to a series of changes at its 42 stores across the state.

Staff at Macy's, one of US retailing's big names, were said to have targeted shoppers because of their colour.

US actor Rob Brown was among customers suspected of theft or fraud.

Some complaints against Macy's were from customers who, despite not concealing goods, were detained after moving between floors at the Manhattan store.

Other customers who spoke poor English, and were suspected of shoplifting or credit card fraud, were not allowed to make phone calls or have an interpreter, and were required to sign documents that they could not understand.

CNN host: Nat. Guard said ‘you never know’ what Ferguson ‘n*ggers’ are going to do

CNN host: Nat. Guard said ‘you never know’ what Ferguson ‘n*ggers’ are going to do: CNN host Don Lemon, who has spent recent days reporting from Ferguson, recalled on Tuesday that a member of the National Guard had called protesters the n-word.

During a CNN town hall event about the racial divide in the U.S., an African-American member of the audience asked what safeguards could be put in place to prevent officers from overreacting when dealing with black men.

The Black Sphere’s Kevin Jackson noted that putting body cameras on officers changed the dynamic in police stops.

“If there’s a camera, he knows he’s got to check himself,” Jackson explained. “And if you know an officer has a camera, you also have to check yourself.”

Gordon Parks' 1950s Photo Essay On Civil Rights-Era America Is As Relevant As Ever

Gordon Parks' 1950s Photo Essay On Civil Rights-Era America Is As Relevant As Ever: The images, originally titled "The Restraints: Open and Hidden," were first taken for a photo essay for Life Magazine in 1956. The essay chronicles the lesser-seen daily effects of racial discrimination, revealing how prejudice pervades even the most banal and personal of daily occurrences. Parks doesn't photograph protests, rallies, acts of violence or momentous milestones in civil rights history. No, he prefers the quieter moments in and around the home.

Some photos focus on inequality -- a "colored" line at an ice cream stand or black children window shopping amongst all white mannequins. Others hint ominously at violence, as one child plays with a gun and another examines it solemnly. Such images are especially haunting in retrospect, considering the recent death toll of American black men in this country, over half a century after these photographs were taken.

Yet the majority of Parks' photos focus on the positive over the negative, showing a different breed of civil rights documentation.

Ferguson Shows the Urgent Need for Diversity Still Exists - Higher Education

Ferguson Shows the Urgent Need for Diversity Still Exists - Higher Education: For all your friends who believe we’re somehow “post-racial,” I hope they’ve been watching the news unfold in Ferguson, Missouri.

If we’re celebrating 50 years after the signing of the Civil Rights Act, it’s hard to believe after watching the news there’s been that much progress.

50 years? All negated by a few days in Missouri.

I lived in St. Louis just 13 years after the Civil Rights Act passed and can attest to the segregation that existed back then. Give it time? St. Louis has only calcified in its segregated trends since then, and it has established a negative legacy in everything from housing, education, employment and particularly in law enforcement.

Would more Black cops have helped in Ferguson?

You bet.

And when the Missouri State Highway Patrol was put in charge to help the majority White cops, they weren’t much better. A 2011 report showed the troopers had a minority employee makeup of just 4.62, plainly stating that “the largest disparity exists among Blacks.”

NYPD Chokehold Death Will Go To Grand Jury, Prosecutor Says : The Two-Way : NPR

NYPD Chokehold Death Will Go To Grand Jury, Prosecutor Says : The Two-Way : NPR: A prosecutor in New York is asking a grand jury to consider charges in the death of Eric Garner, who died last month in police custody after an officer placed him in a chokehold, as NPR's Joel Rose reports.

The 43 year-old Staten Island man died after police attempted to arrest him for selling loose cigarettes. Cell-phone video taken by a bystander shows Garner gasping "I can't breathe" as one officer places him in a chokehold, and several others pin him to the ground. The New York City medical examiner's office ruled the death a homicide.

For weeks, protesters led by the Rev. Al Sharpton have called for criminal charges against the officers involved in Garner's death. Sharpton will lead another protest march to the District Attorney's office on Saturday.

Teen births: Most are in the South and Southwest

Teen births: Most are in the South and Southwest: More teens are having babies in the South and Southwest while the fewest are in the Northeast, according to new state-by-state breakdowns of federal data out Wednesday.

Births per 1,000 teenagers (ages 15–19) range from a low of 13.8 in New Hampshire to a high of 47.5 in New Mexico, according to the report from the National Center for Health Statistics based on 2012 data, the most recent available for the states.

In addition to the wide state variations, the same can be said for racial and ethnic breakdowns. Asian or Pacific Islanders had the lowest 2012 rate at 9.7, compared with Hispanic teens who had the highest rate at 46.3. Rates for the other groups are 20.5 for white, 34.9 for American Indian or Alaska Native and 43.9 for black teens.

"Birth rates for Hispanic teens are higher than for other groups," says demographer Stephanie Ventura, the report's co-author. "Right now, even though they dropped a tremendous amount, they are still higher than other groups.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

The Racist Housing Policies That Helped Fuel The Anger In Ferguson | ThinkProgress

The Racist Housing Policies That Helped Fuel The Anger In Ferguson | ThinkProgress: Ferguson, MO, which erupted in chaos this week after police shot an unarmed teenager, has seen extensive racial segregation over the last century. The long history of discriminatory policies has bred simmering tensions about race that have burst forward after the death of Mike Brown.

Ferguson is a prime, and egregious, example of discriminatory housing policies and segregation. Out of 50 metro areas across the country, the St. Louis area where Ferguson is located is the ninth most segregated between whites and blacks.

That fact is a result of both white flight and public policy working in tandem. St. Louis began redlining with a ballot measure in 1916, which won by a substantial majority, creating an ordinance that designated some areas as “Negro blocks.” While it was struck down a year later when a similar ordinance in another area was ruled against by the Supreme Court, realtors were undeterred.

The Horrific Risk Of Gun Violence For Black Kids In America, In 4 Charts

The Horrific Risk Of Gun Violence For Black Kids In America, In 4 Charts: In a moving letter to the family of Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin's mother, Sybrina Fulton, mourned the American epidemic of gun violence against children:

I will support you and your efforts to seek justice for your Michael and the countless other Michaels & Trayvons of our country. The 20 Sandy Hook children. Jordan Davis. Oscar Grant. Kendrick Johnson. Sean Bell. Hadya Pendleton. The Aurora shooting victims. The list is too numerous to adequately mention them all. According to The Children’s Defense Fund, gun violence is the second leading cause of death for children ages 1-19. That is a horrible fact.

Brown, who was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, earlier this month, and Martin, who was slain in Florida by a former neighborhood watch captain in 2012, were both unarmed black teenagers who lost their lives to gun violence.

Experts: K-12 Population Shift Toward Students of Color Will Shed Light on Resource Inequalities - Higher Education

Experts: K-12 Population Shift Toward Students of Color Will Shed Light on Resource Inequalities - Higher Education: For the first time ever, non-Hispanic Whites are projected to make up less than 50 percent of the U.S. K-12 public school population. The National Center for Education Statistics has estimated that minorities will comprise 50.2 percent of students in public school classrooms in the 2014-15 academic year.

The shift comes as the nation’s public schools have enrolled surging numbers of non-White Hispanic children in recent years. Non-White Hispanic children will account for 25.8 percent of American public K-12 students this school year and 28.5 percent in the 2019-20 academic year. In 2009-10, 22.8 percent of American students were Latino, according to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).

Non-Hispanic Whites are projected to make up 49.8 percent this year and 46.9 percent in 2019-20 of American public school students. African-American enrollment in public schools will be 15.4 percent this year and 15 percent in 2019-20. Among American public school students, Asians will make up 5.2 percent this year and 5.3 percent in 2019-20; Native Americans will be 1.1 percent in 2014-15 and 1 percent in 2019-20.

My Good Neighborhood May Not Look Like Your Good Neighborhood - Higher Education

My Good Neighborhood May Not Look Like Your Good Neighborhood - Higher Education: A good colleague, Vasti Torres, wrote a piece years ago entitled “Mi Casa Is Not Always Like Your House.” In this piece she encouraged folks to use a culturally sensitive lens in the context of higher education. Most importantly, she talked about Latino students from a Latina perspective.

I was reminded of her piece when a new faculty member asked me about housing, schooling and just living in this part of the country, and how I navigated finding a place as an African-American female.

I began with a response similar to that of Torres. “What I consider to be a great neighborhood and great schooling is certainly different from what many folks consider to be great neighborhood and schooling,” I said.

When I decided to move to Indianapolis, I asked folks from here about where I should live. Most folks offered similar advice: there were a handful of neighborhoods that were not only great, but they had great schools — and just plain old great neighborhoods.

Digital Media Institute Connecting HBCU Campuses to Their History - Higher Education

Digital Media Institute Connecting HBCU Campuses to Their History - Higher Education: Twenty historically Black colleges and universities came together this summer in Atlanta for one unique initiative to bring their histories alive: the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship/HBCU Summer Institute for Digital Scholarship, in collaboration with the HBCU Library Alliance.

“These colleges are a really important part of the educational system of the United States that often gets overlooked,” says Sarah Melton, digital projects coordinator at the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS). “It was really a privilege to work with these librarians and learn more of where they were coming from.”

As the capstone project of a multiyear grant by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the initiative was designed as an outward-facing program to finish off a set of internal projects that Emory had already completed on campus.

Scholars: Civil Rights Act Hasn’t Leveled Societal Playing Field for Minorities - Higher Education

Scholars: Civil Rights Act Hasn’t Leveled Societal Playing Field for Minorities - Higher Education: SAN FRANCISCO — The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was supposed to end racial discrimination, but people of color might have just as much difficulty today accessing the same health care, educational and employment opportunities as Whites as they did prior to the passage of the historic legislation.

That was the somber consensus of a panel of scholars who examined racial hierarchy in the past 50 years.

For example, the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries have developed race-specific products, such as a drug for African-Americans who endure heart failure, said Dr. Dorothy Roberts, the George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Furthermore, pharmaceutical officials claimed that patients’ medical reactions to the drug differed along racial lines, suggesting that innate differences exist among racial groups.

Making matters worse is when scholars treat race as merely a study of biological differences and ancestry rather than as social construct. “This is what leads to the persistence of racial inequality and a racial caste system,” Roberts said.

Holocaust Survivor Hedy Epstein, Arrested in Ferguson Protest, Says Racism Is Alive in America

Holocaust Survivor Hedy Epstein, Arrested in Ferguson Protest, Says Racism Is Alive in America: Hedy Epstein turned 90 on August 15, and she spent much of last week celebrating. Friends and family traveled to her home in St. Louis, Missouri, to join in the festivities—so many of them, in fact, that it wasn’t until yesterday that she finally had a day to herself. Epstein left her home in the afternoon, accidentally leaving her cell phone behind. By around 4:30pm, she’d been arrested.

A human rights activist and Holocaust survivor, Epstein had been following the unrest in nearby Ferguson, where an unarmed black teenager, Michael Brown, was shot and killed by police on August 9. Ever since, tensions have escalated. Protesters have taken to the streets for nine consecutive nights. Reporters have been arrested and threatened. There have been scattered reports of gunshots, looting and fires, plus countless photos and videos showing an over-militarized police force firing rubber bullets and tear gas into the crowds.

‘Who Speaks Wukchumni?’ - NYTimes.com

‘Who Speaks Wukchumni?’ - NYTimes.com: Throughout the United States, many Native American languages are struggling to survive. According to Unesco, more than 130 of these languages are currently at risk, with 74 languages considered “critically endangered.” These languages preserve priceless cultural heritage, and some hold unexpected value — nuances in these languages convey unparalleled knowledge of the natural world. Many of these at-risk languages are found in my home state of California. Now for some, only a few fluent speakers remain.

This Op-Doc tells the story of Marie Wilcox, the last fluent speaker of the Wukchumni language, and the dictionary she has created. I met her through the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival, an organization that encourages the revival of languages like Wukchumni. Through training and mentorship, it has supported Ms. Wilcox’s work for several years. Ms. Wilcox’s tribe, the Wukchumni, is not recognized by the federal government.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Even before Michael Brown’s slaying in Ferguson, racial questions hung over police - The Washington Post

Even before Michael Brown’s slaying in Ferguson, racial questions hung over police - The Washington Post: FERGUSON, Mo. — When an unarmed black teenager and a police officer crossed paths here last weekend with fatal results, the incident cast a blinding spotlight on a small police department struggling for authority and relevance in a changing community.

Since the shooting, the department has been criticized for how police have handled the response to the incident and for not disclosing key details, including the name of the officer involved.

The department bears little demographic resemblance to the citizens of this St. Louis suburb, a mostly African American community whose suspicions of the law enforcement agency preceded Saturday afternoon’s shooting of Michael Brown, an 18-year-old who this week had been headed to technical college.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Military Revises 'Racially Biased' Hairstyle Rules

Military Revises 'Racially Biased' Hairstyle Rules: WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced Tuesday that the military will allow female service members to have a wider range of hairstyles after the services came under fire for using derogatory language and banning many styles that are popular with African-American women.

The controversy started in March, when the Army released new rules regarding tattoos, hairstyles, grooming and uniforms for soldiers. One of the new regulations banned women from having twists, dreadlocks and multiple braids/cornrows that are bigger than a quarter of an inch.

Black service members quickly spoke out about the rules, arguing that they were racially insensitive and objected to language that called such styles "matted" and "unkempt." Sgt. Jasmine Jacobs of the Georgia National Guard started a petition about the matter on the White House website, writing, "These new changes are racially biased and the lack of regard for ethnic hair is apparent."

Diabetes Rate Soars, Especially Among Blacks And Hispanics

Diabetes Rate Soars, Especially Among Blacks And Hispanics: While Americans can now expect to live longer with diabetes, about two in five will develop the disease over the course of their lifetimes -- a significant jump from previous rate estimates, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers also found that black and Hispanic people are disproportionally affected, with a lifetime risk of more than 50 percent compared to the general population's 40 percent.

These findings have implications for a generation who are still children: The rate increases apply to adults, but also to those born in the first decade of the new millennium, reported Mother Jones.

"We weren't necessarily surprised that it increased, but we didn't expect it to increase this much," the study's lead author, Edward Gregg, chief of the epidemiology and statistics branch in the Division of Diabetes Translation at the CDC, told HealthDay. "Forty percent is a humbling number."

Math's Highest Honor Is Given To A Woman For The First Time : The Two-Way : NPR

Math's Highest Honor Is Given To A Woman For The First Time : The Two-Way : NPR: Four mathematicians were today awarded the Fields Medal, including Iranian Maryam Mirzakhani, the first female mathematician to be given the honor that's often called math's equivalent of the Nobel Prize.

Mirzakhani, 37, is a professor at Stanford University, and was honored in Seoul, South Korea, for her "striking and highly original contributions to geometry and dynamical systems."

Here's more from Stanford:

"The award recognizes Mirzakhani's sophisticated and highly original contributions to the fields of geometry and dynamical systems, particularly in understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces, such as spheres, the surfaces of doughnuts and of hyperbolic objects. Although her work is considered 'pure mathematics' and is mostly theoretical, it has implications for physics and quantum field theory."

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

White Students No Longer To Be Majority In School

White Students No Longer To Be Majority In School: KENNETT SQUARE, Pa. (AP) -- The cheerful sign outside Jane Cornell's summer school classroom in Pennsylvania's wealthiest county says "Welcome" and "Bienvenidos" in polished handwriting.

Inside, giggling grade-schoolers who mostly come from homes where Spanish is the primary language worked on storytelling with a tale about a crocodile going to the dentist. The children and their classroom at the Mary D. Lang Kindergarten Center, near both mushroom farms and the borough's bucolic red-brick downtown, are a subtle reminder of America's changing school demographics.

For the first time ever, U.S. public schools are projected this fall to have more minority students than non-Hispanic whites enrolled, a shift largely fueled by growth in the number of Hispanic children.

Monday, August 11, 2014

Barneys Agrees To Settlement Over Racial Profiling Allegations : The Two-Way : NPR

Barneys Agrees To Settlement Over Racial Profiling Allegations : The Two-Way : NPR: The upscale retailer Barneys has agreed to a settlement over charges of racial profiling at its flagship store in New York.

The agreement includes a $525,000 fine, NPR's Sam Sanders tells our Newscast Desk.

"Barney's will also have to hire an independent anti-profiling consultant," Sanders reports, "and the retailer will have to implement new record-keeping measures to spot profiling and keep track of interactions with local law enforcement."

The nine-month investigation began after two black customers said they were falsely accused of credit card fraud after shopping at Barneys last year.

Private Prisons House More Latinos Than Do Public Ones, Study Finds : Code Switch : NPR

Private Prisons House More Latinos Than Do Public Ones, Study Finds : Code Switch : NPR: In March, Rina Palta reported for Code Switch on a study that found private prisons were disproportionately filled with inmates of color. A broader recent study of federal data from 2005 has revealed something similar: The proportion of white inmates was significantly smaller in private prisons than in public ones, and the proportion of Latino inmates was larger.
An inmate walks through the yard at the North Central Correctional Institution in Marion, Ohio, which recently switched to private management. 

Brett Burkhardt, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Oregon, authored the study. It lands amidst an ongoing debate over how private prisons compare to their public counterparts, in everything from cost-effectiveness to quality of service. If inmates in private prisons were found to have received worse treatment, the study points out, a racial disparity between private and public prison populations could have legal implications.

Burkhardt told me in a phone interview that while there's now a robust and growing body of scholarly literature looking at racial disparities across the U.S. prison system, his study is among the first empirically rigorous analyses of who is being placed into private prisons

At 73, Man Finally Gets Diploma Denied For Defying Segregation : Code Switch : NPR

At 73, Man Finally Gets Diploma Denied For Defying Segregation : Code Switch : NPR: There was no pomp and circumstance, no procession with classmates, but on Friday a school district in Illinois finally handed Alva Early his high school diploma — more than five decades after he attended Galesburg High School.

In 1959, Galesburg banned Earley from graduating and denied him a diploma after he and other African-Americans had a picnic in a park that was unofficially off-limits to blacks.

Earley, now a retired attorney, says he never thought the day would come, but as the Galesburg class of '59 gathered for a reunion this weekend, the school superintendent called Earley forward, dressed in his college gown, to accept his diploma.

A school counselor had warned him in 1959 there could be a price to pay for challenging the city's entrenched segregation — but Earley went anyway.

"We were just trying to send a message that we are people, too," Earley says. "We just had lunch. For that, I didn't graduate."

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Less than 5% of actors in top films are Hispanic, new study finds - The Washington Post

Less than 5% of actors in top films are Hispanic, new study finds - The Washington Post: A new study shows that less than 5 percent of actors in top Hollywood films are Hispanic and that Latinas are more likely than women of any other ethnicity to appear partially or totally naked on screen.

The study of the top 100 grossing films in 2013, by the University of Southern California’s Annenberg school, found that the make-believe world of movies generally does not reflect what America looks like in real life.

About 74 percent of the actors in the study were white, compared with a U.S. population that’s 63 percent non-Hispanic white.

Hispanics, who make up 17 percent of the nation’s population but had 4.9 percent of film roles, were the most underrepresented group on screen. That’s despite the fact that Hispanics bought about 25 percent of all movie tickets and are more likely than any other group to go to the movies, according to the Motion Picture Association of America.

Friday, August 08, 2014

Report: All students benefit by having minority teachers | Daytona Times

Report: All students benefit by having minority teachers | Daytona Times: WASHINGTON – Despite the cry from people of color for more teachers who look like them, both Whites and Blacks benefit from a more diverse teaching force, according to a study by Center of American Progress (CAP).

“A study of the relationship between the presence of African-American teachers in schools and African-American students’ access to equal education in schools found that fewer African-Americans were placed in special-education classes, suspended, or expelled when they had more teachers of color, and that more African-American students were placed in gifted and talented programs and graduated from high school,” stated the report.

Teachers of color also have, “an affinity for infusing their classrooms with culturally relevant experiences and examples, setting high academic expectations, developing trusting student-teacher relationships, and serving as cultural and linguistic resources — as well as advocates, mentors, and liaisons — for students’ families and communities.”

Southwest Fresno leaders criticize hiring of white teacher for Gaston school's cultural studies | Education | FresnoBee.com

Southwest Fresno leaders criticize hiring of white teacher for Gaston school's cultural studies | Education | FresnoBee.com: With just weeks before the new Rutherford B. Gaston Middle School opens in southwest Fresno, community and church leaders are calling on Fresno Unified School District to reconsider its hiring of a white teacher to instruct African-American, Latino and Southeast Asian studies there.

At an early morning news conference Monday, a small group of concerned citizens led by Rev. Karen Crozier met in front of the school on Church Avenue and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

People at the gathering said the new school, which is the first southwest Fresno middle school in decades, needs teachers who reflect the ethnic and racial background of its students.

Wanted: More African-American male teachers | Florida Courier

Wanted: More African-American male teachers | Florida Courier: Program aims to attract more Black males in American’s classroom

BY ERIC BOODMAN
PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE (MCT)

PITTSBURGH — A doctoral candidate at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) recently stood in front of high school students from the Homewood Children’s Village and asked how many planned to go to college. All hands shot up, but when he asked how many planned to go into education, the hands dropped down.  

National statistics echo this scene, which involved about 20 Black students, most from Pittsburgh Westinghouse 6-12 in Homewood. Less than 2 percent of teachers in the U.S. are African-American males, according to Robert Millward, education professor at IUP.

To try to increase those numbers, Millward started the Black Men Teaching Initiative, which led to the teens, male and female, from Homewood Children’s Village attending a workshop at IUP.

Runner-up honour in black student awards (From The Oxford Times)

Runner-up honour in black student awards (From The Oxford Times): A theology student has been named as one of the country’s top black students.

University of Oxford student Tyrone Steele, from Cowley, was ranked second in the Rare Rising Star Awards, which recognise the achievements of the top 10 black students across the country.

The Oxford-born Pembroke College student had previously served as a member on the Youth Parliament and as Young Mayor for the City of Oxford.

The 21-year-old is passionate about Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) issues and hopes to highlight this by organising a London conference this year.

Students from historically black, Hispanic-serving colleges attend intensive summer leadership program at UC Davis Graduate School of Management :: UC Davis News & Information

Students from historically black, Hispanic-serving colleges attend intensive summer leadership program at UC Davis Graduate School of Management :: UC Davis News & Information: Undergraduate students from historically black colleges and universities and from Hispanic-serving institutions will learn about marketing and management skills as part of an intensive two-week program that the University of California, Davis, Graduate School of Management is hosting this summer.

The University of California Summer Institute for Emerging Managers and Leaders, which is a collaboration of UC’s six business schools, offers undergraduates the chance to learn the principles of business development, entrepreneurship and other key management skills. For two consecutive summers, students learn from internationally renowned faculty, take part in hands-on workshops, and develop valuable connections with high-profile industry leaders and their peers.

Prominent South African Poet Responds to Photo of White Students in Blackface - Atlanta Blackstar

Prominent South African Poet Responds to Photo of White Students in Blackface - Atlanta Blackstar: A picture of two white University of Pretoria students, who painted their faces black and stuffed pillows under their skirts to make their buttocks look bigger in an obvious mockery of Black women, has gone viral.

Many outraged people took to the social network Twitter to express their disgust at the students, calling them racist, while others dismissed it as just a bit of fun.

Poet and presenter Lebo Mashile said painting your face black and making a mockery of Black people can never be acceptable and is no laughing matter.

“South Africa is a white supremacist society to its very core, and even though life has changed for a slice of Black people, for the majority of Black people in this country, life hasn’t transformed. The majority of poor people in this country are Black. Many Black people in this country still live like refugees. So why are we shocked that white people don’t respect us?” she asks.

Viewing every black student as at-risk: Are we pathologizing... | Get Schooled | www.ajc.com

Viewing every black student as at-risk: Are we pathologizing... | Get Schooled | www.ajc.com: Here is an interesting piece by University of Georgia professor Peter Smagorinsky on the over application of "at-risk" labels in school data collections.

Smagorinsky says data collection is an example of the expected bureaucratic time-wasting built into organizational life. But he says the new wave of data gathering required of teachers is more than simply irritating and frustrating. It requires teachers judge which students are at risk for school failure based on broad demographic data that essentially leave only one large group label free -- white middle-class kids.

As Smagorinsky notes: "Every student who is not a native-English speaking white kid from a relatively affluent family must be categorized as at-risk; and relatively affluent, native-English speaking white students are treated in this system as free of risk factors."

Marker pays home to W.Va. HS for black students :: WRAL.com

Marker pays home to W.Va. HS for black students :: WRAL.com: WESTOVER, W.Va. — A historical marker now recognizes a significant chapter in the life of Monongalia High School — once the county's only high school for young black men and women.

The Dominion Post reports that alumni gathered in Westover on Friday to dedicate the historic marker, six decades after the school closed.

Claudette Dale was a 10th grader in 1954 when schools around the country were integrated after Brown v. Board of Education. A cheerleader, she finished her high school education at Morgantown High School.

Dale proclaimed it "so wonderful" to see the sign in front of her former school. She's president of the Beechurst and Monongalia Alumni Association.

Another Monongalia High student, Robert McNeill, said the marker leaves a "permanent presence" at the school.

African American students test worse at English than students wh - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports

African American students test worse at English than students wh - Live5News.com | Charleston, SC | News, Weather, Sports: CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) -

PASS results show African American eighth graders in the Tri-county score worse in English than students who speak English as a second language.

PASS stands for Palmetto Assessment of State Standards. It's given to third through 8th grade students each year.

State Representative Wendell Gilliard said he was sad but not shocked at the results.

"It didn't really surprise me in a sense because from a government legislature perspective, we're really not serious about education in the state of South Carolina," Gilliard said.

African American students in both Berkeley and Charleston County scored 6 percent lower than students who are called Limited English Proficient. In DD2, African American students scored 7 percent lower.

Compare that to white students in the Tri-county, who scored between 14 and 33 percent higher than students who say English isn't their first language, Asian students, who scored between 11 and 34 percent higher, and Hispanic students, who scored 10 percent higher in DD2, 4 percent higher in Charleston County and 1 percent lower in Berkeley County.

Report: DCPS mum on suspensions of black students

Report: DCPS mum on suspensions of black students: JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Duval County Public Schools is suspending black students at nearly double the rate of similarly-sized school districts in Florida, according to records reviewed by the Tampa Bay Times.

The Times said efforts to get those records directly from the school district hit a roadblock when school officials told reporters it would take a top-level staffer 80 hours spread over five weeks along with $3,000 to produce the records.

Instead, the newspaper got the records from the Florida Department of Education.

"Examining these records last week, the Times found that Duval's rate of giving black students in-school suspensions was the highest of the state's large urban districts in the 2011-12 school year. In fact, Duval County schools handed in-school suspensions to about 19 percent of its black students that year -- almost double the average rate of suspensions among the state's other big districts," the newspaper reported.

Blacks, Latino educators struggle in profession

Blacks, Latino educators struggle in profession: Minorities are significantly underrepresented in public schools, despite the fact that the number of Black and Latino students have increased.

A new report from the Center for American Progress (CAP) in Northwest — “The Leaky Pipeline for Teachers of Color: Getting More Teachers of Color into the Classroom” — revealed while much has been done in the past 25 years to substantially increase the number of minority teachers, high levels of attrition has offset that success.

“If you spend time in almost any major school district in America today, you will notice that the students often do not look much like the teachers. In fact, in some areas, the students don’t look anything like their teachers,” said Ulrich Boser, a senior fellow at CAP. “There is a significant demographic gap in the largely White teaching profession and an increasingly diverse student population,” he said.

Study: Latino Students Most Segregated in California

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Study: Latino Students Most Segregated in California: LOS ANGELES—

Even though legal school segregation ended in the United States 60 years ago, one study finds segregation still occurs in the U.S. based on income and race. The University of California Los Angeles Civil Rights Project finds that students in California are more segregated by race than ever before, especially Latinos.

Immigrants from Latin America believe that coming to the United States means a better life for their children. But many find themselves living in dangerous places and with a bleak future, said Gary Orfield, co-director of the UCLA Civil Rights Project.

“They are the places where the gangs are concentrated, the crime is concentrated, there is no real job market and the schools are what we call 'dropout factories,'” said Orfield.

Plano trustees adopt goals to improve college-readiness for black, Hispanic students | Dallas Morning News

Plano trustees adopt goals to improve college-readiness for black, Hispanic students | Dallas Morning News: Last night the Plano school board adopted its district improvement plan goals for the year that included getting more black and Hispanic students on track for college.

The goals are set each year to help focus work and set priorities. They cover areas like improving graduation rates and passing rates on state tests for all students.

But Plano school officials also want to focus on the glaring gap between minority students and their peers.

“Are we doing enough in the district to meet their needs?” said Jim Wussow, assistant superintendent for academic services.

A significantly lower percentage of black and Hispanic students do well on college-entrance tests than others. Only 22 percent of African-American students and 34 percent of Hispanics scored at college-ready levels on either the SAT or ACT tests in 2012. Meanwhile, 64 percent of white students did.

And few Hispanic students took either college-entrance test — only 56 percent of Latino students compared to 85 percent of white students and 76 percent of black students. Participation in Advance Placement or IB courses is also significantly lower for the minority students.

Local Latino students complete prestigious internship - Valley Morning Star : Local News

Local Latino students complete prestigious internship - Valley Morning Star : Local News: WASHINGTON, D.C. — Several Valley students have completed a highly com-petitive congressional internship program in the nation’s capital.

Roberto Lopez of Har-lingen, Samantha Rivera of Progreso and Victoria Velasquez of McAllen completed the Congres-sional Hispanic Caucus Institute’s Congressional Internship Program late last month. They each served as interns for local legislators for two months, officials from the CHCI said.

Lopez, a student at Cor-nell University, interned for U.S. Rep. Filemon Vela, D-Brownsville. Velasquez and Rivera both worked in the office of U.S. Rep. Ruben Hinojosa, D-Mercedes, and are both students are enrolled at the University of Texas Pan-American in Edin-burg.

Only 45 interns were chosen for the program from hundreds of appli-cants, officials said.

A more complete version of this story is available on www.MyValleyStar.com.

REGION: Latino students take home lessons from Future Leaders Program - Press Enterprise

REGION: Latino students take home lessons from Future Leaders Program - Press Enterprise: Ixayac Cortez arrived at the 30th annual Inland Empire Future Leaders Program hoping to learn skills that will help him improve his San Bernardino neighborhood.

He joined 134 other Latino eighth- and ninth-graders representing about 50 schools throughout Riverside, San Bernardino, Orange and Los Angeles counties at the six-day, overnight conference that concluded Friday at Astrocamp in Idyllwild.

“Where I come from, there are not a lot of leadership opportunities,” Cortez, 15, said. “We are broken up by the system. Our youth is divided into Chicano and African-American gangs. The area is very low-income and racial profiling is very big there.”

He said it will take a process to control the violence and improve the community.

“Once we stop fighting, we can have more progress to unite and create leaders in our communities that will improve the state of things,” he said.

'The Knick': Cinemax's Quality Play Opens Its Eyes To Race : Monkey See : NPR

'The Knick': Cinemax's Quality Play Opens Its Eyes To Race : Monkey See : NPR: Cinemax's The Knick is an amazing bit of TV filmmaking: a gritty look at a turn of the century hospital, with explicit scenes showing how brutal early discoveries in surgery and medicine must have been in the year 1900.

But as much as I savored director Steven Soderbergh's innovative way of making a period drama feel modern, alongside Clive Owen's masterful take on a gifted, driven surgeon who is secretly a cocaine addict, my eye was drawn to a different character: Andre Holland's Dr. Algernon Edwards.

Edwards is a gifted, Harvard-trained surgeon who becomes the assistant chief of surgery at the Knickerbocker Hospital in New York, circa 1900. Trained in London and Paris, he takes the job at the insistence of the Robertsons, a wealthy family that bankrolls the institution.

New STEM Awards: Breakthrough or Bust? - Higher Education

New STEM Awards: Breakthrough or Bust? - Higher Education: Since 2012, 35 prizes have been given out in physics, life sciences and mathematics. Each awardee won a $3 million prize to continue his or her research—almost five times as much as the unrestricted $625,000, which was recently increased from $500,000, given to winners of the MacArthur Fellowships, or “genius grants,” in all fields.

After the first Breakthrough Prizes in math were announced earlier this summer, several scholars, however, say they doubted the generous prizes would do much to inspire members of groups underrepresented in STEM—racial and ethnic minorities and women—to pursue Ph.D.s or careers in those fields.

“How does this relate to students, increasing the pipeline? I don’t see how. It’s not connected to the pipeline in any way, if it’s not about students,” says Dr. Juan E. Gilbert, the Andrew Banks Family Preeminence Endowed Chair in the Computing & Information Science & Engineering Department at the University of Florida. Gilbert is also creator of Applications Quest, a software system designed to help colleges admit diverse classes of students without preferences.

In Chicago, Neighborhoods That Are More Black Don't Gentrify : Code Switch : NPR

In Chicago, Neighborhoods That Are More Black Don't Gentrify : Code Switch : NPR: So here's one way folks tend to think about gentrification in big cities: Poorer (therefore: browner) neighborhood becomes more attractive to folks of more means (therefore: whiter) who are in search of lower housing costs. As more and more better-off folks move in, new amenities and fresh investment follow. And that, in turn, brings more demand for the neighborhood among potential gentrifiers, which pushes up housing costs and drives out the people of color who lived there before.

A new study by Harvard researchers suggests that there's also a racial ceiling to how neighborhoods gentrify, at least in Chicago, the city they examined. Robert Sampson and Jackelyn Hwang found that neighborhoods that are more black tend to stay that way.

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Why Aren't Top Films Diverse As The Real World? They Miss Hispanics : Code Switch : NPR

Why Aren't Top Films Diverse As The Real World? They Miss Hispanics : Code Switch : NPR: Imagine you were the most loyal customer to the hottest restaurant in town. And when you walked in the door, you were given the worst seat in the house.

That's kind of how Hollywood is treating Hispanic filmgoers, if you believe the results of a new study by the University of Southern California. It shows that the 100 highest-grossing films of last year underrepresented nonwhite characters in speaking roles.

One big reason, according to the numbers in the study, was a lack of nonwhite Hispanic characters in the 3,932 speaking roles analyzed. Just 4.9 percent of those parts were filled by Hispanic characters, though they are 16 percent of the U.S. population.

But Hispanics also buy 25 percent of all movie tickets, leveraging $1 trillion in spending power. Which means Hollywood isn't paying much of a price for ignoring a loyal constituency.

Rich Kid, Poor Kid: For 30 Years, Baltimore Study Tracked Who Gets Ahead : NPR Ed : NPR

Rich Kid, Poor Kid: For 30 Years, Baltimore Study Tracked Who Gets Ahead : NPR Ed : NPR: ...Racial Disparities

Houser's story reflects another facet of the Johns Hopkins study. The researchers found that more affluent white men in the study reported the highest frequency of drug abuse and binge drinking, yet they still had the most upward mobility.

"The extent of what we refer to as problem behavior is greatest among whites and less so among African-Americans," Alexander says. "Whites of advantaged background had the highest percentages who did all three of those things — that was binge drinking, any drug use and heavy drug use."

These numbers, from Alexander's research, show the racial disparities in men with similar drug problems and arrest records:

At age 22, 89 percent of white high school dropouts were working, compared with 40 percent of black dropouts. And by age 28, 41 percent of white men born into low-income families had criminal convictions, compared with 49 percent of the black men from similar backgrounds.

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

After Discrimination Finding, Jury's Out On Memphis Juvenile Courts : NPR

After Discrimination Finding, Jury's Out On Memphis Juvenile Courts : NPR: For people connected to the Memphis juvenile courts, April 2012 is unforgettable. That's when federal investigators determined that the Shelby County juvenile court system discriminated against African-American defendants.

The Justice Department said that the system punished black children more harshly than whites. In the most incendiary finding, investigators said the court detained black children and sent them to be tried in the adult system twice as often as whites.

The finding came after a three-year investigation, but not everyone in the Shelby County court system buys it. "I said I've been here a long time. I've never seen any evidence of that happening," says Judge Curtis Person. He's led the Shelby County juvenile court in Memphis for the past eight years, and steadfastly denies allegations of discrimination.

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Before 'Freedom Summer,' A Wave Of Violence Largely Forgotten : Code Switch : NPR

Before 'Freedom Summer,' A Wave Of Violence Largely Forgotten : Code Switch : NPR: This summer we commemorate the Freedom Summer participants who faced death — and in some cases were murdered — for trying to transform the racial landscape of America. This week marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the bodies belonging to James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman, three civil rights workers who were brutally killed while trying to register blacks to vote in Mississippi. Their disappearance had drawn the national news media and federal investigators to Neshoba County, Miss.

That lethal terror was not reserved for civil rights activists alone: Groups like the Ku Klux Klan exacted violence against black people who they thought were acting above their station.

San Jacinto College Focusing on Promoting STEM to Its Underserved Minority Student Body - Higher Education

San Jacinto College Focusing on Promoting STEM to Its Underserved Minority Student Body - Higher Education: As the No. 3 city for the most tech job growth in the last decade, Houston is shaping up to be a hub of not only industry but STEM education.

Overall, the city saw a 24.1 percent jump in STEM careers from 2001 to 2013, according to a Praxis Strategy Group survey, a number that many educators in the area say they are aware of and impacts their work.

“I think the need for more STEM workers is both a local and national issue,” says Dr. Alexander Okwonna, dean of health and natural sciences at San Jacinto College, located in the Houston metro area. “Globally, for the United States to keep up with the rest of the world, we’re going to have to step up the number of student graduates, and to do that we’re going to need more women and minorities to come on board and go into STEM careers.”

Scholars Dig Deeper into Educational Challenges Black Boys Face - Higher Education

Scholars Dig Deeper into Educational Challenges Black Boys Face - Higher Education: A new book titled African American Male Students in PreK-12 Schools is receiving national attention for its deep analysis of the pressing issues that Black boys face, as well as solutions for how education practitioners might best address some of these challenges.

Published in May by Emerald Press, the book’s editors, Drs. James L. Moore III and Chance W. Lewis, collaborated on the project to “highlight those educational research practices, and policies that weakens school and life outcomes for Black males.”

Moore and Lewis said that their book helps to explain “why existing education practices, policies and systems need a major overhaul in order for African American males to have a chance of succeeding in school and beyond.”

Diversity in top films misrepresents U.S. population

Diversity in top films misrepresents U.S. population: Diversity in top Hollywood films is significantly below that of the U.S. population, according to a new study by the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

The study examined 3,932 actors who spoke at least one word in the 100 top-grossing films of 2013.

Fewer than 5% of actors in top Hollywood films are Hispanic, though they make up 17% of the population. The study determined the group to be the most underrepresented, even though Hispanics bought about 25% of all movie tickets and are more likely to be moviegoers than any other group, according to the Motion Picture Association of America.

"Hispanics and Latinos are one of the fastest growing groups in the U.S.," said Marc Choueiti, one of the study's authors. "If popular films were the only way to gauge diversity, viewers would be completely unaware of this. Individuals from this group are almost invisible on screen."

Monday, August 04, 2014

Black officers dismissed at greater rate than whites

Black officers dismissed at greater rate than whites: WASHINGTON — The forced culling of majors from Army ranks is taking a bigger toll on black officers than those from any other ethnic group, according to Army personnel documents.

Almost 10% of black majors are being dismissed from the Army, records show, compared with 5.6% of the white majors. Eight percent of the Hispanic majors will be dismissed, while 5.8% of the Asian-Pacific Islanders are to be relieved.

In all, the Army is cutting 550 majors from its force through notifications likely to take one month. The move follows pink slips sent to about 1,000 captains as the Army seeks to shrink its force to 490,000 soldiers by the end of 2015. If automatic budget cuts return after 2015, the Army could be reduced to 420,000 soldiers by 2019. There about 513,000 soldiers on active duty.

Friday, August 01, 2014

Is Race Plastic? My Trip Into the ‘Ethnic Plastic Surgery’ Minefield - The Cut

Is Race Plastic? My Trip Into the ‘Ethnic Plastic Surgery’ Minefield - The Cut: “You’ve got some nice Caucasian features,” Dr. Edmund Kwan says, inspecting my face at his Upper East Side plastic-surgery practice, where the waiting room includes an ottoman larger than my kitchen table. “You’re half-Asian mixed with what?” Chinese mom and white dad, I reply. “You inherited a Caucasian nose. Your nose is nice. Your eyes have a little bit of Asian mixed in.” He proposes Asian blepharo-plasty, a surgical procedure to create or enlarge the palpebral fold, the eyelid crease a few millimeters above the lashline that many Asians lack. “You’ve got nice big eyes,” he admits, but eyelids more like my father’s would make them look bigger.

To some, Kwan’s assessment may seem offensive—an attempt to remove my mother’s race from my face as though it were a pimple. But to others, it will seem as banal as a dietitian advising them to eat more leafy greens—advice having nothing to do with hiding one’s race or mimicking another.

Taco Bell Manager: I Was Fired For Hiring Hispanics | ThinkProgress

Taco Bell Manager: I Was Fired For Hiring Hispanics | ThinkProgress: Juanita O’Connell, a 60-year-old Taco Bell employee, has sued the company after she says she was fired for hiring Hispanic employees.

O’Connell, who is of Mexican descent herself, has worked at the company since 1987 and was most recently a general manager. In her complaint filed with the district court in Indianapolis, she alleges that last year her operations leader, Mark Lewis, told her not to hire Hispanics. When he came to her store and saw a Hispanic employee, he said, “Didn’t I tell you not to hire Hispanics” or something similar. “She does have a witness who was present when he made that statement,” her lawyer, Joel Paul of the Ramey & Hailey law firm, told ThinkProgress.

About two weeks later, she says a higher up issued her a disciplinary warning “after asking [her] misleading questions about her operation,” the complaint states. Then three hours later, she was fired, told that she violated the manager code and had an I-9 violation.

The complaint also alleges that she was treated differently than other, similar, non-Hispanic, male employees in violation of Title VII, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, sex, and other characteristics.

Taco Bell has not returned a request for comment.

Want To See The World? Try A Library In Queens : Code Switch : NPR

Want To See The World? Try A Library In Queens : Code Switch : NPR: The aggressive vibrato of the bandoneon hung in the air. While the tango singer spoke of romantic spats, hopeless drunkards and lonely whores, an elderly Argentine couple clasped hands.

The haunting music would have made for a steamy evening if not for the setting. The celebration of Argentine tango took place not in some hip Latin club on the Lower East Side or in a dark corner of a Buenos Aires cafe, but in a drab basement room with plastic chairs and gray walls in the Jackson Heights branch of the Queens Library.

New York's Queens borough is among the most ethnically diverse counties in the nation, its immigrant-filled neighborhoods teeming with taco joints, Dominican beauty salons and women in headscarves. It's no surprise, then, that the borough's library system has also strived for unparalleled diversity.

Breaking Out The Broken English : Code Switch : NPR

Breaking Out The Broken English : Code Switch : NPR: A little part of me cringes every time I do it, but at this point it's second nature.

It's hard to describe in words, but it involves a lot of leveling, a lot of smoothing. The tongue stays closer to the center of the mouth rather than doing the pronounced, defined highs and lows that shape the L and R sounds. The vocal cords vibrate in smooth, singing tones rather than doing the little hop up and down that makes for a normal American English syllable.

And after a few practice sentences, it slips effortlessly from my mouth. "Herro, and wercome to Beijing. Zhis is yoah guide to an ancient culchah ..."

Lo and behold, I'm speaking English in a "Chinese accent."

I shouldn't complain — no actor can really get upset about a source of steady work. As I've pointed out, when Asian characters don't have accents it just means that white voice artists end up playing them. In all the kerfuffle about the "whitewashing" of M. Night Shyamalan's live-action version of The Last Airbender, people totally ignored that the voice cast of the cartoon it was based on was also almost all white people playing Asian characters.

Lead Exposure Study to Focus on Black Women in Cincinnati - Higher Education

Lead Exposure Study to Focus on Black Women in Cincinnati - Higher Education: With support from the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, University of Cincinnati researchers are launching a study of African-American women to determine whether childhood lead exposure has affected bone and muscle health as the women who will be studied have matured into their early-to-mid-30s.

The research project, which is part of the long-term Cincinnati Lead Study, will involve 120 women who were born in high-lead risk areas of Cincinnati between 1979 and 1984. Involving researchers from the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine, the UC Department of Environmental Health and the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, the Cincinnati Lead Study has followed 376 people and is the longest-running study of lead exposure effects on health and development in the world.

Powerball Win Helps Marilyn Fields Spread Her Love for Shaw University - Higher Education

Powerball Win Helps Marilyn Fields Spread Her Love for Shaw University - Higher Education: Marilyn Fields never dreamed of becoming a millionaire. But a twist of fate, and a lucky choice of a Powerball ticket, sent $2 million her way in early July.

The first check she wrote was to her alma mater, Shaw University. Fields’ ties to Shaw run deep. She is the executive assistant of Shaw president Dr. Gaddis J. Faulcon and has worked at Shaw for the past 33 years.

“I graduated in May, 1976, and started to work here in June, 1976,” Fields said. “I met my husband here, my son graduated from Shaw, and I have my job here, so it’s in our blood.”

With her check, Fields fully endowed a $25,000 scholarship fund she had started earlier this year.

“This lottery has provided me the opportunity to go ahead and satisfy my financial obligation for this scholarship,” she said. The scholarship is need based and will be available to any student who is able to maintain a C average.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Suspensions fall further in Montgomery County high schools -- Gazette.Net

Suspensions fall further in Montgomery County high schools -- Gazette.Net: The number of black and Hispanic high schoolers suspended from school fell in the second half of this past school year when compared with a year earlier, according to Montgomery County Public Schools data.

That continues a trend. School officials reported in March that, based on the first half of the school year, suspensions were down compared with the previous year, although more for white students than for their black and Hispanic peers.

School officials attributed the drop, in part, to professional development for staff that focused on race and equity.

While the schools have been looking at suspensions overall, the disproportionate numbers between ethnic and racial groups created a focus, said Christopher Garran, associate superintendent for high schools.

Classical Music Program Thrives in Milwaukee's Latino Community - NBC News.com

Classical Music Program Thrives in Milwaukee's Latino Community - NBC News.com: MILWAUKEE, Wis. -- Close your eyes and the music will transport you to a symphony hall, to a Mozart violin concerto worthy of a prime stage. You would never know it just by listening, but none of the students have ever played an instrument before enrolling in the program. That’s the magic of the Latino Arts Strings Program at the United Community Center in Milwaukee. The program has helped Latino children gain more than just musical mastery - it's been a key to scholarships, musical careers and self-confidence and pride.

Schools must ‘shut up and listen’ to students | The Kansas City Star

Schools must ‘shut up and listen’ to students | The Kansas City Star: Christopher B. Knaus proposes what some educators might consider a radical way to improve student performance in urban schools.

He explains it in his book “Shut Up and Listen: Teaching Writing That Counts in Urban Schools.” It’s a way to “transform our schools from the silencing, oppressive places they are.”

Knaus is a professor of education and director of educational leadership at the University of Washington-Tacoma. He has taught in urban schools and worked with African American and Latino students to understand the silencing effect of Eurocentric curriculum, teachers and instruction.

“African American students consciously resist educational silencing through maintaining a voice that reflects cultural values and forms of expression,” the book notes. Often, however, that voice earns students of color no points with teachers because it is worlds away from how mostly white educators were raised, taught and grade.

ISLE students document Latino culture

ISLE students document Latino culture: Over the summer, students in Intensive Semester Learning Experience (ISLE) 397, a 6-credit intensive interdisciplinary arts and humanities course, have been going out into the community and gathering information to create a Wiki site, Idaho Latinopedia.

This Wiki will serve Boise State and the greater community as a means of exploring Latino culture in Boise: from its history to present citizens and from restaurants to community resources.

Erin Gerry, a Spanish major pursuing her second bachelor’s degree, said she really appreciated the guest speakers who spoke during the first several weeks of the course. Gerry said one particular guest speaker, Rosaura Conley-Estrada, debunked stereotypes about Latino women. Conley-Estrada provided data showing Latino women only have one more child on average than white women in America, proving that the perception of Latino women having a lot of kids is incorrect.

Evansville fathers, other parent-figures, encouraged to participate in the 2014 Million Father March - story

Evansville fathers, other parent-figures, encouraged to participate in the 2014 Million Father March - story: EVANSVILLE - The first day of school can be stressful for students, but the Million Father March aims ease any apprehension they may feel by having fathers or other significant male figures in their lives provide an “escort of safety, support and encouragement” as they re-enter the classroom.

As a way for men to show commitment to their children, families and communities, the Evansville Commission on the Social Status of African American Males and the Evansville-Vanderburgh County Human Relations Commission is inviting local fathers or male guardians to participate in the 2014 March, scheduled for Aug. 11, the first day of school for many local districts.

“Although symbolic, it is a very significant day in the lives of students,” said David Wagner, chairman of the Evansville Commission on the Social Status of African American Males. “Hopefully it’s an opportunity to prepare students for success. And it’s really to show, or extend a hand of partnership, between the schools, the community, the families and the students. It’s kind of extending that village approach.”

Another Reason Why Segregated Education Is Bad For Young Students

Another Reason Why Segregated Education Is Bad For Young Students: A new study offers more evidence that segregated schooling is bad for students.

The study, from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, used previously compiled data from the Department of Education to track how first-grade students' reading abilities change over time, depending upon whether they attend a racially segregated or integrated school. It found that black students in segregated schools tended to make smaller gains in reading than their black counterparts in more integrated schools. This held true even when researchers accounted for black students’ backgrounds.

The study defines a segregated school as one where 75 percent of its population is made up of minorities. Researchers used data from the 1998 – 99 Early Childhood Longitudinal Study on about 4,000 first-graders nationwide.